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How does Go handle security when working with sensitive data, and what are the best practices for security in Go programs?

Go has several built-in features and libraries to ensure the security of its programs when handling sensitive data. 

Here are some of the best practices for security in Go programs:

Input validation: Always validate input data from external sources to ensure it meets expected standards and to prevent malicious attacks, such as SQL injection and cross-site scripting (XSS). Use the standard library package "regexp" to validate regular expressions.

Avoid buffer overflow: Use the standard library's "bufio" package to buffer input/output to avoid buffer overflow attacks.

Use encryption: Use the standard library's encryption packages to encrypt sensitive data at rest, such as "crypto/aes" for AES encryption and "crypto/tls" for transport layer security (TLS).

Secure communication: Use secure protocols, such as HTTPS and SSL/TLS, to secure communication between your application and external systems.

Avoid hardcoded credentials: Avoid hardcoding sensitive data, such as passwords, keys, and tokens, in the code. Instead, store them in environment variables or configuration files, which can be accessed securely at runtime.

Limit access to sensitive data: Limit access to sensitive data by implementing access controls, such as role-based access control (RBAC) and attribute-based access control (ABAC).

Regularly update dependencies: Regularly update the dependencies of your Go programs to address any security vulnerabilities and maintain the security of your program.

Follow security best practices: Follow general security best practices, such as implementing strong authentication and authorization mechanisms, regularly backing up data, and monitoring your application for security breaches.

By following these best practices and utilizing Go's built-in security features and libraries, you can help ensure the security of your Go programs when handling sensitive data.

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